MoT exemption

Most vehicles built or registered before January 1, 1960 are currently exempt from annual roadworthiness (MoT) testing in the UK.
• Owners are still legally responsible for ensuring that their pre-1960 vehicles are in roadworthy condition.
• Owners can still voluntarily submit their vehicles for testing.
• Large goods vehicles (with a maximum laden weight of more than 3.5 tonnes) and buses (vehicles with more than eight seats) that are used commercially aren't exempt.

From May 20, 2018, the cutoff for MoT test exemption will become a rolling 40-year date, meaning that most vehicles built or registered at least 40 years previously, and qualifying for Vehicle of Historic Interest (VHI) status, will no longer require an annual MoT test.
• In order to claim MoT-exempt VHI status for a vehicle, the owner will have the option to tick a VHI declaration box as part of its annual road tax renewal procedure.
• To qualify as a Vehicle of Historic Interest, the vehicle must not be 'substantially modified' from its original specification, as defined by the Department of Transport/Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency.
• Guidance on what constitutes 'substantially modified' can be found here found here
• Owners will still be legally responsible for ensuring that their pre-1960 vehicles are in roadworthy condition.
• Owners can chose instead to voluntarily submit their vehicles for testing.


road tax exemption

• The point at which historic vehicles can become exempt from road tax in the UK is a rolling 40-year date.
• Vehicles built at least 40 years before the first date of the current year do not have to pay road tax in the UK, so currently this means those built before January 1, 1977.
• If you don't know when your vehicle was built, but it was first registered before January 8, 1977, it is exempt.
• In order to claim road tax exemption, click here
• More details can be found here