MARKET WATCH June 2018 week 3

Biggest market fallers revealed

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Ferraris, a Ford and two Maseratis are the latest to slide. Ten out of the top 16 market fallers are Ferrari this month, with drops ranging from 2.5% for the Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona to 14% for the 166 MM Barchetta. Alas, bargain hunters, you'll still pay £320-575k and £2.85-6m respectively.

The cooling of Ferrari prices is following an investor led gold rush, but those more interested in profit than the cars themselves aren't the buying force they were a couple of years ago. That leaves enthusiasts who are still willing to buy the right car at the right price, and all of the Ferraris that have lost value in the Price Guide Movers update in the latest issue of Classic Cars are intrinsically desirable. Like the Lusso, a car that's dropped  7.1% so that you'll pay £850k-1.3m, depending on quality of the restoration, originality and provenance.

For more buying tips and market advice, including Quentin Willson's Hot tips, check out the latest issue of Classic Cars.

MGB GTs make their move

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These stylish hatchbacks have come out of the Roadster’s shadow at last. It seems that forever the GT was the bargain route to B ownership, with smart examples of even the chrome bumper cars being buyable for a couple of thousand, if you were in the right place at the right time.

Recently we've seen a 1970 example make £10k at auction, and that was an older restoration,  a plastic bumper 1977 car sold for £4.7k and a lovely, original 1973 car took £20k. To some extent, the MGB GT is reflecting the trend for most of the upward market activity being concentrated at the affordable end of the price guides. But, Aas with Jaguar E-types, it's also clear that coupés are no longer the poor relation to their roadster sisters as they're increasingly appreciated for their own style and added practicality.

For more buying tips and market advice, including Quentin Willson's Hot tips, check out the latest issue of Classic Cars.

We want this Ferrari 308GTBi

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Fresh from a body and interior restoration 12 months ago, this 1982 GTBi seems ready to enjoy. It's reassuring that the body was done a while ago because any residual rust or deficiencies in the paintwork would have betrayed themselves by now.

There's a good file of service history that shows this 46,500-mile car has been properly looked after , although it will be due its next cambelt change before too long. If they're well looked after and the bodies are rust-free these cars can be affordable to run by Ferrari standards, and even in modest 214bhp GTBi form, a delight to drive.

The only snag is finding the £99.9k asking price.

For more buying tips and market advice, including Quentin Willson's Hot tips, check out the latest issue of Classic Cars.

Buy a Maserati Quattroporte V?

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Good examples of this handsome and indecently rapid saloon will never be any cheaper so now's a good time to make a move while there are still well-maintained and lightly used examples to choose from. While £10k tends to limit your choice to high-mileage (75k+) cars, £15k should net you something will fewer than 50k miles but a 4.7 with similar mileage is more like £25k. Top of the tree is the Sport GT S, with prices in the £28-35k range accordingly.

Of course, fear of expensive repair bills have driven prices down to these tempting levels. Bills like £3km for new timing variators and £1800 for a part of Skyhook dampers are certainly sobering, but you can arm yourself with all of the essential check for deal-breaking problems and either walk away form afflicted cars, or budget accordingly. It's all spelled out in our in depth buying guide in the current issue of Classic Cars.

For more buying tips and market advice, including Quentin Willson's Hot tips, check out the latest issue of Classic Cars.